Troy Davis: An Alienable Right to Life?

Troy Davis. Courtesy of Amnesty.org.uk

The USA tries to project itself as a moral compass for the rest of the world. Its interventions in Libya and Afghanistan were pitched to the American public (and the rest of the world) as necessary because of the atrocities and human rights violations that were being committed by governments that were deaf to protest.

It’s never been one to shy away from hypocrisy either.

Tonight sees another man about to be murdered by the state under dubious circumstances. Georgia, never know for its tolerance, will execute Troy Davis at midnight (GMT time) for the 1989 murder of an off-duty policeman. However, since his conviction, seven out of the nine original witnesses have recanted their statements and one has even implicated another man who allegedly admitted the murder at a party in 2009.

Despite numerous appeals to prove there is reasonable doubt to halt the execution and the actions of human rights groups in America and in Europe the Georgia Parole Board refused to grant clemency.

Regardless of whether or not Troy Davis is actually guilty, can America still really justify this form of punishment?
Continue reading Troy Davis: An Alienable Right to Life?